• 2016: on roller-coasters

    A trying year for the vintners, nonetheless ending with very nice wines.

    After a devastating spring (frost, rain, diseases), the region enjoyed a very nice summer, as well as a sunny September. This resulted in very ripe wines, rather concentrated, with a "je ne sais quoi" underlying their elegance, charm, and soul ...

    A season everyone in the region will remember !
    Analyses and Tastings
    The scope of the frost that hit Burgundy late April is unheard of in a very long time. One has to call on the « old guys » to remember something similar: perhaps in 1945 ? This dramatic start was confirmed when it appeared that secondary buds would not compensate at all ... And vineyards which at first appeared unscathed showed smaller and fewer berries than normal.

    During a particularly humid month of May, a dawny mildew epidemic wreaked havoc. Certain vineyards seemed to literally "catch fire", with symptoms appearing in just 48 hours and reaching the grapes themselves. Usually, it is the leaves that take the hit. The vintner was under maximum pressure, and wondered even in June if he would be able to keep the diseases in check: powdery mildew also was beginning to pick up, who knew where it would end ?

    Then, a miracle: rain stopped almost completely, and July was fair, August warm and sunny ...At the beginning, it was taken as a respite, a pause in that crazy run to disaster, enabling people and equipment to rest. But as a warm and dry summer went on, questions shifted nature: how should we protect the berries from sun burns, are the vines evolving slowly because of the lack of water, should we harvest sooner than we thought ? Slowly, another type of vintage, definitely warmer, was taking shape, and with it, our mood shifted.

    The drought did not stop until late August. Even after that date, weather did not change much: it remained calm, temperatures were warm, and precipitations isolated, although sometimes abundant. Rain had been desired and indeed, it allowed the vineyards to restart the ripening process. But berries also increased in size (30 mm of rain in a few days just do not fall unnoticed), and it could have proved dangerous in the end if that messy weather had carried on. Fortunately, it was not the case, and with good weather back, concentration and ripening could resume.

    In the end, harvest started on September 26th, in ideal conditions.
    Harvesters picked very healthy grapes for the most part. There were one or two threatening episodes but in the end, no significant precipitations. It was a serene process, as much as this term can be used for a harvest ... But still, what a contrast compared to the agony we went through at the beginning of the year ! As if nature wanted to right itself ... Harvesting vineyards stricken by frost was indeed difficult: however few grapes there remained, they were difficult to find in vines which had regrown as bushes. A lot to do for a meagre result.


    Wines are often at, or over 13,5° alc. and taste fully ripe.

    Malo-lactic fermentations were quiet and un-eventful. They allowed the slightly aggressive finish felt after vinifications to mellow. The vintage has not turned too soft however, and acidities are at a good level, with pHs around 3.5, which shows a good balance.

    A very good surprise: the deepness that is now evident in these wines. A character they acquired during summer and their second autumn ... Beyond an evident charm, showing through their caressing and very soft texture, a good structure is detectable. Many cuvées show nice length, with a spicy finish, mineral even, that was not expected of such a ripe vintage.

    2016 is not far from the concentration of 2015 !
    Who would have thought of such a result when we were so low at the end of June ?
    A comparison with 2006 is possible: the vintage is in the shadow of the glorious 2005, nonetheless, it was a ripe vintage, harvested also at the end of September, and that never closed. We wish the same fate to 2016 !


  • 2017, a vintage that feels good in burgundy!

    After several years marked by cataclysmic phenomena, Burgundy winemakers, impatient and febrile, wondered what 2017 had in store for them.

    THE SEASON
    RIPENING AND VINIFICATION
    The scope of the frost that hit Burgundy late April is unheard of in a very long time. One has to call on the « old guys » to remember something similar: perhaps in 1945 ? This dramatic start was confirmed when it appeared that secondary buds would not compensate at all ... And vineyards which at first appeared unscathed showed smaller and fewer berries than normal.

    During a particularly humid month of May, a dawny mildew epidemic wreaked havoc. Certain vineyards seemed to literally "catch fire", with symptoms appearing in just 48 hours and reaching the grapes themselves. Usually, it is the leaves that take the hit. The vintner was under maximum pressure, and wondered even in June if he would be able to keep the diseases in check: powdery mildew also was beginning to pick up, who knew where it would end ?

    Then, a miracle: rain stopped almost completely, and July was fair, August warm and sunny ...At the beginning, it was taken as a respite, a pause in that crazy run to disaster, enabling people and equipment to rest. But as a warm and dry summer went on, questions shifted nature: how should we protect the berries from sun burns, are the vines evolving slowly because of the lack of water, should we harvest sooner than we thought ? Slowly, another type of vintage, definitely warmer, was taking shape, and with it, our mood shifted.

    The drought did not stop until late August. Even after that date, weather did not change much: it remained calm, temperatures were warm, and precipitations isolated, although sometimes abundant. Rain had been desired and indeed, it allowed the vineyards to restart the ripening process. But berries also increased in size (30 mm of rain in a few days just do not fall unnoticed), and it could have proved dangerous in the end if that messy weather had carried on. Fortunately, it was not the case, and with good weather back, concentration and ripening could resume.

    In the end, harvest started on September 26th, in ideal conditions.
    Harvesters picked very healthy grapes for the most part. There were one or two threatening episodes but in the end, no significant precipitations. It was a serene process, as much as this term can be used for a harvest ... But still, what a contrast compared to the agony we went through at the beginning of the year ! As if nature wanted to right itself ... Harvesting vineyards stricken by frost was indeed difficult: however few grapes there remained, they were difficult to find in vines which had regrown as bushes. A lot to do for a meagre result.


    Wines are often at, or over 13,5° alc. and taste fully ripe.

    Malo-lactic fermentations were quiet and un-eventful. They allowed the slightly aggressive finish felt after vinifications to mellow. The vintage has not turned too soft however, and acidities are at a good level, with pHs around 3.5, which shows a good balance.

    A very good surprise: the deepness that is now evident in these wines. A character they acquired during summer and their second autumn ... Beyond an evident charm, showing through their caressing and very soft texture, a good structure is detectable. Many cuvées show nice length, with a spicy finish, mineral even, that was not expected of such a ripe vintage.

    2016 is not far from the concentration of 2015 !
    Who would have thought of such a result when we were so low at the end of June ?
    A comparison with 2006 is possible: the vintage is in the shadow of the glorious 2005, nonetheless, it was a ripe vintage, harvested also at the end of September, and that never closed. We wish the same fate to 2016 !




    After a dry, cold winter,
    vine vegetation moved quickly, with temperatures well above normal in March and April. This was the first pressure on vineyard crews because the winter work had been delayed. Then, the region experienced great agitation due to a frost warning at the end of April.

    The rest of the season, though, was quite calm: a warm and beautiful spring caused fear of a very early harvest, especially as vine flowering accelerated in early June. A heat wave followed at the end of that month, but finally, heavy rains in July, which did not affect the integrity of the grapes, slowed the pace.

    Throughout this period, disease pressure was low. As winemakers are never completely serene, we began to fear that the vines were suffering from water stress...

    It was obvious, however, that the nature of the vintage was becoming clearer: in particular, the abundance of grapes. Even if it was tempting after two weak years, there was no question of ignoring a crop thinning. The hardest part was to adjust and properly assess the harvest potential, which was ever growing, since vines were so well supplied with water.



    The final stage of ripening was a fairly sunny and not overly wet month of August, ending, unfortunately, with a notable rain event early september, generating accumulations on the order of 30 mm (1.2 inches). On top of that, the weather forecast was alarmist...

    In these scenarios, we always face the difficult choice between giving the vines time to perfect maturation and of not letting sanitary conditions deteriorate. What's more, when the weather forecasts are very uncertain, it's difficult to resist the pressure of picking to ensure there is a harvest.

    In the end, our choices benefited from the circumstances we were given: a robust harvest, not prone to disease and in particular to rot; weather conditions more favorable than had been announced, with most of the bad weather touching Burgundy only in its Northern reaches.
    It was, finally, under these very good conditions that we were able to bring in a healthy and abundant crop, especially in vineyards affected by frost last year. There, the vines had clearly compensated for the previous vintage.

    Fermentations went on quietly. The first pressings announced good balance: a good sugar content and standard acidity. Grapes were very healthy and we encountered few difficult fermentations. It was quickly clear, however, that the vintage was not going to look like its two predecessors, 2015 and 2016, characterized by sun and concentration.
    2017 has produced elegant wines--very flexible, rather easy, showing a Burgundy always in love with finesse. Malolactic fermentations started quickly and confirm the trend of a caressing vintage, all in sweetness, without harshness. For once, it seems that it is Burgundy that resembles Oregon, and not the other way around...

  • a report on the domaine, by monopole magazine


    Around the year at the Domaine ...

    https://www.monopole-magazine.com/grand-format/domaine-meo-camuzet/


    Nice article, in French, with very nice photos, the mood is well described ...

  • destination oregon

    Nicolas-Jay, the Oregon venture initiated by Jean-Nicolas Méo and his friend Jay Boberg (and supported by the domaine) is now entering a decisive phase with the release of its first wine on April 2nd. Check out the new website at nicolas-jay.com
    Find out more

    Nicolas-Jay, the Oregon venture initiated by Jean-Nicolas Méo and his friend Jay Boberg (and supported by the domaine) is now entering a decisive phase with the release of its first wine on April 2nd.


    Check out the new website at      http://www.nicolas-jay.com


    The 2014 season in Oregon was deceptively easy: warm and sunny, healthy grapes, good crop, easy-going harvest (well, it was a first harvest, it is never that easy). 

    The resulting wines were sweet and forthcoming, so the challenge was to craft a cuvée with finesse, subtlety, and discreet structure. 

    Bottled this last December, we are very proud to present this typical Oregon wine, displaying upfront blackberry and raspberry jam aromas, and in the mouth, a rich and velvety texture finishing with a hint of youthful tannins that help maintain the tension until the end.